Many of my family members have lived on and off again in the area of Crescent City, California. My dad spent hours wandering the redwoods of Jebediah trail, writing music and pondering life’s biggest mysteries. My grandparents helped raised cousins, nieces, nephews and grandchildren, including myself, in the earliest years of my life. Today, my oldest and closest cousin has returned to this little nugget of beautiful wildlife and impoverished culture, to maximize his career in surf photography. My dad and I visited him for a few days and on our trip, my dad insisted that we stop and visit Pebble Beach.

The beach has less pebbles than the name implies. If anything, it was covered in beautiful green moss, ice plant, and driftwood. The beach isn’t quite as wide as ours in areas like Oxnard Shores, but it’s got a pretty good amount of sand left, just a short distance from a public access road. Here and there along the road are lookouts, atop medium height cliff sides overlooking the blue water and big, black rocks. There are rocky formations everywhere you look on the horizon, leaving a feeling like being a character in The Goonies. Even on what would have been a hot, sunny day in our coastal area, this beach was my ideal: cold, wet, and gray. Only a few miles away from redwoods, I can see the appeal this coastal area has had on my family.

This beach and its surrounding nature trails have a lot to offer, but unfortunately much of the community surrounding it is poor, and unemployed. There are few businesses and not much areas for profit based around the natural structures. All the attractions (woods, beaches, cliff sides) and free of recreation and infrastructure, for the most part… which poses an unfortunate conflict. Do we compromise the size and quality of these beautiful areas by introducing money-making opportunities, or do we keep the area quiet, and untouched? Time will tell.